EHRD  Programmes of study on HRD in Europe > Review of Masters programmes
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The tentative results of the overview of Masters programmes in Europe are summed up below, guided by three questions:.

What is the state of progress in implementing Masters programmes in Europe? (See progress)

Apart from the UK, five countries have already got established Masters programmes (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Ireland, Portugal and Sweden), while eight countries are in the initial process of developing these; a major 'break through' of Masters programmes across Europe may be expected to happen around 2005. This suggests that in the present and immediate period ahead, the choice of Masters programmes available outside the UK is modest, with only small countries or a few institutions of major countries being involved.

Which Masters programmes related to HRD are already available in European countries? (See directory)

In this initial overview, the majority of examples of Masters programmes correspond to the Bologna definition and to a broad interpretation of HRD. In additional, there is a  selection of European or International MBA (Master in Business Administration) programmes which include the specialisation of HRD or HRM. 

While the origin and profile of these two types of programme (Masters according to Bologna and MBA) are different, they both share professional expertise in the subject matter (HRD related studies) and partly also professional staff and resources. Furthermore, MBA programmes are part of an established career market which new Masters programmes may have to take into account. It is noteworthy that quite a number of new Masters programmes (Bologna process) have a European or international profile (in terms of language and contents). 

What is the pattern of HRD related subject fields in Masters programmes? (See map)

The range of HRD related fields of study compiled for this overview is broad and tentative. Although the focus of data collection has been on HRD as a specific field, only very few programmes found so far are definitely and exclusively concerned with this subject. The great majority of programmes are much broader in content, particularly related to HRM or business administration or management (with an HRD/HRM component included). Also, quite a number of programmes offer an interdisciplinary or problem oriented profile, for instance entrepreneurship; organisational behaviour; leadership and organisational development; management of people, projects and processes. Issues of this kind also turn up as individual components of more general programmes (HRM etc.), e.g. strategic intelligence, or business intelligence; innovation and knowledge; learning and knowledge in organisations; learning and development. These patterns can be observed throughout the countries involved in this overview, even if an impact of national characteristics is noticable at the same time, not least in the terminology applied.

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