VET&HRD
 
VET and HRD research in European countries > Profile  [Areas]    [1]    [2]    [3]    [4]    [5]    [6]    [7]

Profile  [5]  Funding frameworks and support structures for research

Country outlines  [AT] [BE] [BG] [CY] [CZ] [DE] [DK] [EE] [ES] [FI] [FR] [HU] [IE] [IT] [LT] [LV] [MT] [NO] [PL] [PT] [RO] [SE] [SI] [SK] [UK]

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There is a great variety of funding sources and arrangements related to VET and HRD research in European countries. The following analysis is based on the evidence provided in the national reports (see  Overview, aspect 5). It starts out from selecting a few major indicators of funding: national and/or EU funding; public or private funding. These are combined to represent three archetypes of funding, which have been identified across countries:
  • Mainly national public funding;
  • National public funding and EU funding in combination (e.g. ESF);
  • National public funding, private funding and EU funding in parallel.
The distribution of these archetypes of funding for research are presented in the map below.
 
DK
FI
NO
SE
     
             
AT
BE
 
BG
CZ
EE
DE
FR
 
HU
LT
LV
IE
UK
 
PL
RO
SI
SK
             
CY
ES
IT
MT
PT
 
  Archetypes of funding for research
I
(A) Mainly national public funding
I
(B) National public funding and EU funding in combination
I
(C) National public funding, private funding and EU funding in parallel

The regional differences with regard to funding patterns are obvious: While national public funding (A) is typical of Northern and Western Europe (AT, BE, DK, ES, FI, FR, NO, SE, UK), the combination of national and EU funding (B) is a characteristic of Central-Eastern and partly Southern Europe (BG, CZ, EE, HU, LT, LV, MT, PL, PT, RO, SI SK). A mixture of national, private and EU funding (C) can be found in a few Western and Southern countries (CY, DE, IE, IT). 
   Patterns of funding for VET/HRD research are partly determined by socio-economic frameworks, such as the operation of EU supported developmental programmes in the new member states. Furthermore, they are influenced by the allocation of funds for education and training as a whole. Finally, the patterns are dependent on general arrangements for supporting research (e.g. the role of public and private foundations).

NOTE: The Profile of national research is based on a comparative analysis of selected activities in 25 European countries (see Overview). This data has been compiled from the national reports prepared by the Cedefop ReferNet in 2006 and subsequently published by Cedefop (see Introduction and Reference). 

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Editor: Sabine Manning  © WIFO